I C ENGINE LABORATORY

An internal combustion engine (ICE) is a heat engine where the combustion of a fuel occurs with an oxidizer (usually air) in a combustion chamber that is an integral part of the working fluid flow circuit. In an internal combustion engine the expansion of the high-temperature and high-pressure gases produced by combustion apply direct force to some component of the engine. The force is applied typically to pistons, turbine blades, or a nozzle. This force moves the component over a distance, transforming chemical energy into useful mechanical energy. The first commercially successful internal combustion engine was created by Etienne Lenoir around 1859. and the first modern internal combustion engine was created in 1864 by Siegfried Marcus.

The term internal combustion engine usually refers to an engine in which combustion is intermittent, such as the more familiar four-stroke and two-stroke piston engines, along with variants, such as the six-stroke piston engine and the Wankel rotary engine. A second class of internal combustion engines use continuous combustion: gas turbines, jet engines and most rocket engines, each of which are internal combustion engines on the same principle as previously described. Firearms are also a form of internal combustion engine.

Objective:

The aim of laboratory is to teach the basic applications of basic laws of thermodynamics, process of energy conversion in I.C. engines. The internal combustion engine is a rich source of examples of almost every conceivable type of heat transfer. There are a wide range of temperatures and heat fluxes in the various components of the internal combustion engine. Internal combustion engines come in many sizes, from small model airplane engines with a 0.25 “(6 mm) bore and stroke to large stationary engines with a 12″ (300 mm) About 25 % of the air/fuel mixture energy is converted to work, and the remaining 75% must be transferred from the engine to the environment. The testing of engine is necessary to verify the performance of the engine as per the specification of the manufacturer. Exhaust gas analysis necessary for to control emissions like carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons and to ensure complete combustion of fuel as far as possible also to control max. Temperatures of combustion products by varying air fuel ratios. Student will be able to,
1. Understand the performance parameters in evaluation of IC engine
2. Calculate the speed of IC engine, fuel consumption, air consumption, etc.
3. Evaluate the exhaust smoke and exhaust emission
4. Differentiate between the performance of SI engine and CI engines.

List of Major Experiments:

  • Determination of calorific value of a fuel by Bomb calorimeter.
  • Flue gas analysis by ORSAT apparatus.
  • Study of valve timing diagram of Diesel Engine.
  • Performance Test of a multi cylinder Petrol Engine by Morse method.
  • Performance Text of an I.C. Engine using electric (eddy current) dynamometer.
  • Use of catalylitic converters and its effect on flue gas of an I.C. Engine.
  • Study of MPFI (multipoint fuel injection system).

Major Equipments:

BOMB CALORIMETER
FLASH POINT AND FIRE POINT APPARATUS
4 STROKE PETROL ENGINE WITH ELECTRICAL LOAD BOX
4-STROKE DIESEL ENGINE WITH ROPE BRAKE DYNAMOMETER

ORSAT APPARATUS